How to Select Measurements for CREATION Health Research

Goals for the Center for CREATION Health Research include the development and validation of CREATION-specific surveys and research instruments.

In the interim, the following validated instruments are recommended for measurement of CREATION Health Principles. Many are in the public domain and available for use; all sources should be attributed. Obtaining permissions for instrument use is the sole responsibility of the researcher.

Choice

Patient Activation Measure

The Patient Activation Measure (22 items) and the short form of the Patient Activation Measure (13 items) measures a patient's knowledge, confidence, and skill to manage self-care. 

More Information:

https://www.insigniahealth.com/products/pam-survey

References:

Hibbard, J. H., Stockard, J., Mahoney, E. R., & Tusler, M. (2004). Development of the Patient Activation Measure (PAM): conceptualizing and measuring activation in patients and consumers. Health Services Research, 39(4p1), 1005-1026.

Hibbard, J. H., Mahoney, E. R., Stockard, J., & Tusler, M. (2005). Development and testing of a short form of the patient activation measure. Health Services Research, 40(6p1), 1918-1930.

University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA)

The University of Rhode Island Change Assessment measures readiness to change based on the Transtheoretical Model. The general problem-based version is a 32-item validated instrument. There are also versions specific to substance abuse and other issues.

More Information:

https://habitslab.umbc.edu/urica/
https://web.uri.edu/cprc/psychotherapy-urica/

References:

McConnaughy, E.N., Prochaska, J.O., & Velicer, W.F. (1983). Stages of change in psychotherapy: Measurement and sample profiles. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 20, 368-375.

Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC)

The Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC) is a series of three validated scales that measure perceived control of health by internal choice, influential contacts, and chance.

More Information:

https://nursing.vanderbilt.edu/projects/wallstonk/index.php

References:

Wallston, K. A., Strudler Wallston, B., & DeVellis, R. (1978). Development of the multidimensional health locus of control (MHLC) scales. Health Education Monographs, 6(1), 160-170

Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory

The Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory is a validated questionnaire that identifies which pre-identified conditions are conducive and detrimental to healthy lifestyle choices in 8 domains.

For permission and access, contact author Dr. Carolyn Tucker: cmtucker@ufl.edu

References:

Tucker, C. M., Rice, K. G., Hou, W., Kaye, L. B., Nolan, S. E., Grandoit, D. J, et al. (2011). Development of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory. Psychological Assessment, 23(2), 487-503.

 

Rest

The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index

The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index is a 10-item validated instrument that measures sleep quality and disturbance retrospectively over a one-month period using self-reports. Users must request permission from the author to utilize the instrument.

More Information:

http://www.sleep.pitt.edu/research/instruments.html

References:

Buysse, D. J., Reynolds, C. F., Monk, T. H., Berman, S. R., & Kupfer, D. J. (1989). The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index: a new instrument for psychiatric practice and research. Psychiatry Research, 28(2), 193-213.

Mollayeva, T., Thurairajah, P., Burton, K., Mollayeva, S., Shapiro, C. M., & Colantonio, A. (2016). The Pittsburgh sleep quality index as a screening tool for sleep dysfunction in clinical and non- clinical samples: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Sleep Medicine Reviews, 25, 52-73.

The Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory

The Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory is 20-item a validated instrument that measures general fatigue, physical fatigue, reduced activity, reduced motivation, and mental fatigue. Contact author for permission to use the instrument in published research (Email: e.m.smets@ams.uva.nl)

More Information:

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-1-4419-9893-4_57#page-1

References:

Smets, E. M. A., Garssen, B., Bonke, B. D., & De Haes, J. C. J. M. (1995). The Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI) psychometric qualities of an instrument to assess fatigue. Journal of psychosomatic research , 39 (3), 315-325.

Environment

PhenX Toolkit Social Environments Survey

The PhenX Toolkit contains recommended, validated measures for biomedical research, selected by a panel of domain experts. Three self-report measures relevant to environmental health are:

Neighborhood Collective Efficacy - Community Cohesion and Informal Social Control
Neighborhood Safety
Healthy Food Environments
Neighborhood Environment (From Physical Activity and Physical Fitness domain)

More Information:

https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/index.php?pageLink=browse.measures&id=210000

References:

Hamilton, C. M., Strader, L. C., Pratt, J., Maiese, D., Hendershot, T., Kwok, R., et al. (2011) The PhenX Toolkit: Get the Most From Your Measures. American Journal of Epidemiology, 174(3), 253-60.

WHOQOL-BREF Environment Domain

The WHOQOL-BREF measures four quality of life domains, including environment (as well as physical health, psychological and social relationships). The entire validated instrument contains 26-items, 8 of which comprise the environment domain.

More Information:

http://www.who.int/mental_health/media/en/76.pdf

References:

WHOQOL Group. (1998). Development of the World Health Organization WHOQOL-BREF quality of life assessment. Psychological Medicine, 28(3), 551-558.

Activity

International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)

The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) is a 27-item valid and reliable survey, available in multiple languages, that collects self-reported physical activity participation within the previous week.

More Information:

https://sites.google.com/site/theipaq/

References:

Craig, C. L., Marshall, A. L., Sjorstrom, M., Bauman, A. E., Booth, M. L., Ainsworth, B. E., et al. (2003). International physical activity questionnaire: 12-country reliability and validity. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 35(8), 1381-1395.

Pittsburgh Enjoyable Activities Test (PEAT)

The Pittsburgh Enjoyable Activities Test (PEAT) is an instrument to measure the correlation between a variety of leisure-time activities and psychological and physiological well-being.

More Information:

https://www.cmu.edu/common-cold-project/measures-by-study/psychological-and-social-constructs/social-relationships-loneliness-measures/restorative- activities.html

References:

Pressman, S. D., Matthews, K. A., Cohen, S., Martire, L. M., Scheier, M., Baum, A., & Schulz, R. (2009). Association of enjoyable leisure activities with psychological and physical well-being. Psychosomatic Medicine, 71(7), 725.

Trust

Belief Into Action Scale (BIAC):

The Belief Into Action Scale is a 10-item scale to measure religious commitment and practice.

More Information:

http://file.scirp.org/Html/10-1420300_53453.htm

References:

Koenig, H. G., Nelson, B., Shaw, S. F., Al Zaben, F., Wang, Z., & Saxena, S. (2015). Belief into Action scale: A brief but comprehensive measure of religious commitment. Open Journal of Psychiatry, 5(1), 66-77.

FACIT-SP- 12 and FACIT-SP Non Illness

FACIT-SP is 12-item assessment of spirituality in those with and without chronic illness Please attribute creator David Cella, Ph.D

More Information:

http://www.facit.org/facitorg/questionnaires

References:

Peterman, A. H., Fitchett, G., Brady, M. J., Hernandez, L., Cella, D. (2002). Measuring spiritual well-being in people with cancer: the functional assessment of chronic illness therapy—Spiritual Well-being Scale (FACIT-Sp). Annals of behavioral medicine, 24(1), 49-58.

Bredle, J. M., Salsman, J. M., Debb, S. M., Arnold, B. J., Cella, D. (2011). Spiritual well-being as a component of health-related quality of life: the functional assessment of chronic illness therapy—spiritual well-being scale (FACIT-Sp). Religions, 2(1), 77-94.

Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness And Spirituality (BMMRS)

The Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness and Spirituality (BMMRS) is a validated 38-item measure to assess domains such as: daily spiritual experiences, values/beliefs, forgiveness, commitment, etc.

More Information:

http://fetzer.org/resources/multidimensional-measurement- religiousnessspirituality-use-health-research

References:

Traphagan, J. W. (2005). Multidimensional measurement of religiousness/spirituality for use in health research in cross-cultural perspective. Research on Aging, 27(4), 387-419.

Interpersonal Relationships

Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS)

The MSPSS is a 12-item validated scale to measure support from family, friends and significant other.

More Information:

http://gzimet.wixsite.com/mspss

References:

Zimet GD, Dahlem NW, Zimet SG, Farley GK. The Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Journal of Personality Assessment 1988;52:30-41.

Dahlem, N. W., Zimet, G. D., & Walker, R. R. (1991). The multidimensional scale of perceived social support: a confirmation study. Journal of clinical psychology, 47(6), 756-761.

Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL-12)

The Interpersonal Support Evaluation List is a 12-item validated instrument that assesses personal perceptions of four areas of social support: appraisal, belonging, self-esteem, and tangible.

More Information:

http://www.psy.cmu.edu/~scohen/scales.html

References:

Sherbourne CD and Stewart AL. The MOS Social Support Survey. Soc Sci Med 1991; 32(6): 705- 714

Outlook

Life Orientation Test – Revised (LOT-R)

The LOT-R is a 10-item validated instrument to assess variability in generalized optimism versus pessimism.

More Information:

http://www.psy.miami.edu/faculty/ccarver/sclLOT-R.html

References:

Scheier, M. F., Carver, C. S., & Bridges, M. W. (1994). Distinguishing optimism from neuroticism (and trait anxiety, self-mastery, and self-esteem): A re-evaluation of the Life Orientation Test. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 67, 1063-1078.

Brief COPE

Brief COPE is a validated, 28-item instrument with 14 subscales to assess use of coping strategies.

More Information:

http://www.psy.miami.edu/faculty/ccarver/sclBrCOPE.html

References:

Carver, C. S. (1997). You want to measure coping but your protocol’s too long: Consider the Brief COPE. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine , 4, 92-100

Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS)

The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule is a validated scale comprised of two 10-item instruments to measure positive and negative emotional states.

More Information:

http://www.statisticssolutions.com/positive-and-negative-affect-schedule-panas/

References:

Watson, D., Clark, L. A., & Tellegen, A. (1988). Development and validation of brief measures of positive and negative affect: the PANAS scales. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54(6), 1063-1070.


Self-reflection and Insight Scale (SRIS)

The Self-reflection and Insight Scale is a validated 20-item measure of two constructs of private self-consciousness. 

More Information:

https://www.sbp-journal.com/index.php/sbp/article/view/1219

References:

Grant, A. M., Franklin, J., & Langford, P. (2002). The self-reflection and insight scale: A new measure of private self-consciousness. Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal, 30(8), 821-835.

Roberts, C., & Stark, P. (2008). Readiness for self‐directed change in professional behaviours: factorial validation of the Self‐reflection and Insight Scale. Medical Education, 42(11),1054-1063.

Nutrition

Intuitive Eating Scale-2

The Intuitive Eating Scale-2 is a validated and reliable 23-item Likert scale measurement of adaptive eating based on hunger cue/satiety.

More Information:

https://u.osu.edu/tracyltylka/scales-developed/

References:

Tylka, T. L., & Kroon Van Diest, A. M. (2013). The Intuitive Eating Scale–2: Item refinement and psychometric evaluation with college women and men. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 60(1), 137.

Food Choice Questionnaire

The Food Choice Questionnaire is a validated instrument to determine the importance of nine influences – health, mood, convenience, sensory appeal, natural content, price, weight control, familiarity and ethical concern – on personal food choice.

Contact author for permissions and copy of instrument: a.steptoe@ucl.ac.uk

More Information:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8746966

References:

Steptoe, A., Pollard, T. M., & Wardle, J. (1995). Development of a measure of the motives underlying the selection of food: the food choice questionnaire. Appetite, 25(3), 267-284.

Three Factor Eating Questionnaire R-18

The Three Factor Eating Questionnaire R-18 is a brief self-report measure of three domains: cognitive restraint, uncontrolled eating and emotional eating.

More Information:

https://scienceofbehaviorchange.org/measures/three-factor-eating-questionnaire-r18/

References:

de Lauzon, B., Romon, M., Deschamps, V., & Lafay, L. (2004). The Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-R18 Is Able to Distinguish among Different Eating Patterns in a General Population1. The Journal of Nutrition, 134(9), 2372-2380.

Karlsson, J., Persson, L. O., Sjöström, L., & Sullivan, M. (2000). Psychometric properties and factor structure of the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) in obese men and women. Results from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study. International Journal of Obesity, 24(12), 1715-1725.